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Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Economics that considers Conscious Forces

The entity that makes use of body is jeevan.  Among jeevan’s activities, it is mind (mun) that mostly uses body.  Behind mind (mun) there is successive alignment of realization, understanding (bodh), contemplation, and comparison activities in jeevan, for it to make use of body in a righteous way.   Jeevan keeps the body alive for its safe keeping.  It is mind (mun), that remains devoted to keep the body alive.  “Remains devoted” means – working for its inherent purpose, by being close together and complementary.  Body’s aliveness is in the form of jeevan’s taking cognizance of sensory activities of sound, touch, sight, taste and smell or their getting ‘seen’ by jeevan.  The sound is heard through the ear instrument, while the meaning of that sound gets recognized and accepted in jeevan, in the form of one or the other reality in the existence.  It is with this shared acceptance of realities that humans interact with one another.  Anyone can examine this phenomenon in oneself. 


In this way, wealth is through body and it is for jeevan’s use, righteous use, and purposeful use.  This is the meaning of economic resource.  Jeevan forces (mind) devote labor and generate wealth by instilling utility and art value on natural abundance.  This is the way of appreciating true value of physical things.  The fulfillment of jeevan is on the basis of righteous use and purposeful use of physical things as their getting devoted for nourishing body and doing production with art of living in universal order.  In this way, economic cyclicality becomes evident by projection of jeevan forces for instilling utility and art value on natural abundance, and in turn jeevan’s becoming fulfilled and being assured of its continuity from appreciating usefulness, righteous use, purposeful use of this wealth.  Each human being can do this experiment that involves jeevan, body and natural surroundings.

- Excerpt from English Translation of "Avartansheel Arthshastra" by Shree A. Nagraj  

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